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Warren Middle School donates $200 to Tourette Center after inspiring presentation

NJCTS Youth Advocate Sarah Ethridge gives a presentation on Tourette Syndrome at Warren Middle School. Her efforts netted a $200 donation for the NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders.
NJCTS Youth Advocate Sarah Ethridge gives a presentation on Tourette Syndrome at Warren Middle School. Her efforts netted a $200 donation for the NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders.
WARREN -- Sarah Ethridge has spoken to crowds of all ages and sizes during her two-plus years as a Youth Advocate for the NJ Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders. Her presentation is captivating, informative and essential -- regardless of whether it's being given to a handful of educators or to an auditorium of more than 500 junior high students.

Her most recent presentation was November 2013 at Warren Middle School, and it was one to remember. Not only did the students, teachers and parents in attendance learn that Tourette Syndrome is an inherited, misdiagnosed, misunderstood neurological disorder that affects 1 in 100 kids, they were so impressed that they decided to give back.

As a result of Ethridge's presentation, the Warren Middle School staff, students and Parent Teacher Organization donated $200 to NJCTS -- a first resulting from talk given by a Youth Advocate such as Ethridge.

"Sarah is a remarkable young woman," said Anya Muhlhauser, a member of the Warren Middle School Cultural Arts Committee. "She engaged our students so well, and I so admire her courage, honesty and bravery in her mission to educate and enlighten others about Tourette Syndrome (through) her message of acceptance and support."

Ethridge, a junior at Chatham High School, addresses concepts such as tics -- involuntary sounds and movements that accompany Tourette Syndrome -- anti-bullying and self-advocacy during her 30-minute presentation.

“We are truly grateful for the generosity of the students, faculty and parents at Warren Middle School, and thank them for teaming up to support the Tourette Syndrome community,” NJCTS Executive Director Faith W. Rice said. “We graciously accept this donation, which will effectively serve the children and families throughout New Jersey through our statewide education outreach, peer advocacy and family support initiatives.”

For more information on Tourette Syndrome or NJCTS' Youth Advocate Program, please call 908-575-7350 or visit www.njcts.org.

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